Improve Your “Techno-etiquette” During Cell Phone Courtesy Month

We’ve all been there: enjoying a pleasant meal in a nice restaurant, when someone at the next table starts talking too loudly on a cell phone. Perhaps we’ve even been that other Bluetooth-Headsetperson a time or two.

In July 2002, business etiquette expert Jacqueline Whitmore created National Cell Phone Courtesy Month to encourage us all to be more respectful of our surroundings when using our phones. Whitmore created eight tips to help us improve our cell phone savvy:

1. Let your voicemail take your calls when you’re in meetings, courtrooms, restaurants or other busy areas. If you must speak to the caller, use the e-mail or text messaging feature or excuse yourself and find a secluded area.

2. Speak in your regular conversational tone and don’t display anger during a public call. Speaking loudly or showing emotion may distract those around you.

3. Use your vibrate function or turn off your phone in public places such as movie theaters, concerts, religious services, medical and dental offices, restaurants, etc.

4. If you are expecting a call that can’t be postponed, alert your companions ahead of time and excuse yourself when the call comes in; the people you are with should take precedence over calls you want to make or receive.

5. Avoid interrupting meetings, social gatherings or personal conversations by answering your wireless phone, checking your voicemail, or texting someone. Discreetly excuse yourself if you must take a call.

6. Use discretion when discussing private matters or confidential information in front of others. You never know who is within hearing range.

7. When walking and talking on your wireless phone, be aware of your surroundings and remember to respect the rights of others.

8. Practice wireless responsibility while you’re driving. Place calls when your car is not moving. Don’t text or make or answer calls while in heavy traffic or in hazardous driving conditions. Use a Bluetooth headset type device whenever possible.

That last one goes without saying, of course, and many states have enacted legislation requiring motorists to make only hands-free calls. It’s always best to pull over before using your phone, but if you must keep driving, stay safe and comply with the law with The Superior Noise Canceling Bluetooth Headset. This headset produces clear, crisp conversations on a train, in a car, or in other noisy settings, without static. Unlike other Bluetooth headsets that are uncomfortable, this superior model has an ergonomic design and three different sized silicone ear fittings that provide customizable comfort.

Ultimately, when you’re in the company of friends, associates, or clients, put down that phone and be in the moment. Don’t be a smartphone abuser, be a smart phone user!

No Blind Spot Rear View Mirror

The No Blind Spot Rear View Mirror is used by police departments and professional race car drivers to increase their ability to see other vehicles around them.

No Blind Spot Rear View MirrorStandard automobile rear view mirrors provide a 52-degree view of what’s behind your vehicle. The No Blind Spot Rear View Mirror gives you a 180-degree field of visibility so you have a clear picture of every driver traveling around your car. Even when driving on a highway as wide as five lanes, you’re able to see all traffic behind you. You can remain aware of other drivers moving around your car, and passing your vehicle until they move beside you and enter your peripheral vision. The patented, seamless mirror is distortion-free, and at night it automatically reduces glare from trailing headlights by 50%. Simply clamp to your existing rear view mirror — no tools or adhesives are required — and it is ready to use.

Knowing who and what are around you at all times will help new and seasoned drivers alike be more prepared for whatever situation you encounter. Make your driving experience safer, with The No Blind Spot Rear View Mirror from Hammacher Schlemmer.

The No Blind Spot Rear View Mirror