Setting the Path for Jet-Setting Travel

Sixty-seven years ago tomorrow, the world’s first passenger jet airliner, the British De Havilland Comet, made its premiere test flight in the U.K. The jet engine was a game-changing unique gift for the airline industry, reducing by half the time it took to fly.12628_1000x1000

You can learn more about this and other great moments in the history of flight in this personalized book of New York Times articles focusing on aviation through the years. Procured from the archives of The Times, the book presents highlights spanning from the Wright Brothers’ first flight to Charles Lindbergh’s Transatlantic crossing and Amelia Earhart’s mysterious disappearance. The bound book displays the recipient’s name and “The New York Times History of Aviation” stamped in gold on the cover.11803_1000x1000

Ready to make your own aviation history but can’t quite get off the ground? This amazingly realistic flight simulator is installed into a cockpit that equips players with the same flight controls found in actual aircraft. Fore/aft and left/right movement of the yoke controls pitch and roll just like real airplanes; toggles and buttons provide authentic control of navigation and radio options. The software features realistic graphics and includes 80 flyable aircraft ranging from the ubiquitous Mooney Acclaim to the daunting Boeing 747-800.82741_1000x1000

Complete the experience with these aviators’ sunglasses, just like those worn by U.S. Army AH-64 Apache Helicopter pilots. Made by a supplier to the U.S. military for more than 30 years, the sunglasses feature the iconic aviator shape and a non-corroding nickel silver frame. The scratch- and impact-resistant lenses are made from the same distortion-free glass used on watch faces, with a grey tint providing the truest colors.

That prototype Comet jet was designed to carry 36 passengers at speeds up to 500 mph. Although the original design was plagued by catastrophic flaws, aviation historians agree that De Havilland’s Comet left the unique gifts of a legacy that changed the way we travel today.

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