How The Ziegfeld Follies Changed Broadway Forever

The Little ShowThe Roaring 20s marked a time of social and political change in the U.S. As with most cultural transformations, the entertainment industry reflected these ground-breaking shifts in American society.

When the Ziegfeld Follies premiered its annual program at Manhattan’s New Amsterdam Theatre on this date in 1924, the production helped pave the way for a more modern era in Broadway entertainment. Creator Florenz Ziegfeld envisioned a show featuring light, yet sophisticated, entertainment for the summer season. A smashing success, the annual Ziegfeld Follies productions became the main event of the theater season and changed the Broadway musical forever.

Combining jazz, vaudeville-style acts and beautiful women wearing elaborate costumes, the Follies launched the careers of many big-name stars, including Barbara Stanwyck, Paulette Goddard, Gypsy Rose Lee, Josephine Baker and Marilyn Miller.

Another musical production of that era called The Little Show further satisfied theater-goers’ appetites for stylish entertainment. Debuting in 1929 at the Music Box Theater, the musical revue featured the songs of Arthur Schwartz and lyrics of Howard Dietz.

Dietz, who is often credited with creating MGM’s Leo the Lion mascot, may have had a penchant for unique gadgets. We have the distinction of inspiring a song in the show. A particularly witty ditty was titled Hammacher Schlemmer, I Love You, sung by none other than Fred Allen. This tribute enjoyed nationwide popularity.

Since its place in The Little Show in 1929, Hammacher Schlemmer has evolved from New York’s favorite, high-quality hardware store to purveyors worldwide of innovative, problem-solving products that meet the special needs of our customers…which really isn’t different at all from our hardware store beginnings back in Broadway’s younger days.

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