The Keys To Self Expression – The Manual Typewriter

Manual TypewriterA lot has changed in how we put words on paper since Christopher Latham Sholes patented the typewriter 145 years ago today. But in a world dominated by e-mail, multi-function printers, and Siri, manual typewriters remain surprisingly popular among collectors and users alike.

Dedicated manual typists maintain that their favorite typewriters, unlike computers, have unique personalities: different sounds, different feels. Stroking the keys of a typewriter takes a little bit more work, but is arguably more engaging than lightly tapping away at the PC.

Using a typewriter may not eliminate writer’s block, but it certainly can reduce distractions. There’s no e-mail, Facebook, or Twitter to tempt you away from your work.

Even Sholes might be surprised by the number of websites, not to mention a magazine and a virtual museum, dedicated to collecting vintage typewriters. Collectors can even call actor Tom Hanks one of their own. He has admitted to having over 200 manual typewriters in his collection.

Do you long to feel the rhythm of the keys as the words flow from your fingers? The Wordsmith’s Manual Typewriter recalls the thoughtful, well-written correspondence of yesteryear. Devoid of technological crutches such as spell-check and deletion, each of its 44 keys requires a firm, purposeful stroke for a steady click-clacking cadence that encourages the patient, considered sentiment of a wordsmith who thinks before writing.

Our typewriter even comes with a handy built-in carrying case. You’ll be the hit of your local coffee shop…and you won’t have to search for a plug.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>